Sunflower - Mammoth Grey
Sunflower - Mammoth Grey $3.79
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Sunflower Variety: Mammoth Grey Family: Asteraceae               Botanical Name: Helianthus annuus Hardiness Zones: 5,6,7,8,9 Growing Difficulty:  1                         Soil PH:  4.5 to 8.0 Fertilizer Requirements: 10-10-10 Soil Type: Well Drained Soil Germination (days): 14 to 28             Soil Temp for Germination: 60-70°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN Days to Maturity:  90 - 120 Planting Depth:  1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  12” Row Spacing: 12 - 18” Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN FULL SUN WHEN SOIL TEMPS ARE ABOVE 60°F Starting Indoors 6-10 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST Growing Tips Direct sow your seeds in the garden when soil temperatures are between 60-70°F. Transplant from indoor starts when soil temperatures are around 70°F. Plant multiple seeds outdoors or in each cell (indoor starting) and thin to the most successful plants. We tend to plant Sunflowers at random without thinning and allow them to establish on their own without intervention. Culinary Uses Mammoth Grey Sunflowers are known for their large heads and numerous seeds. The seeds harvested are usually roasted, salted and eaten as a snack. Birds also love sunflower seeds, so do not be surprised to see them stealing your seed crop. Harvesting Seed Harvesting sunflower seeds can be fun for everyone. Wait until the sunflower petals start to wilt and fall off the sunflower head. The head should start to become dry and brown and may even start to fall over. Once the heads start to become brown, place a paper bag upside-down over the head of the sunflower. (This protects your seeds from birds and squirrels). Check your sunflower heads daily to see if the seeds have become hard. Once the seeds are hard enough to harvest, cut the stem of the flower and hang it upside down to dry thoroughly. Once the heads and seeds have dried enough, running your hands back and forth over the seeds will release them. Roast your seeds as a snack or save them for next years harvest. (We recommend saving your seeds from the first harvest to produce hundreds of plants the next year)
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Dill - Common
Dill - Common $3.29
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Dill Variety: Common Family: Apiaceae Botanical Name: Anethum graveolens Hardiness Zones: 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11 Growing Difficulty:  2         Soil PH:  5.5 to 6.7 Fertilizer Requirements:  5-10-5 Soil Type: Well Drained, Slightly Acidic Germination (days): 7 to 14 Soil Temp for Germination: 60-70°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN Days to Maturity:  65 – 75    Planting Depth:  1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  12" Row Spacing: 24-36" Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN FULL SUN WHEN SOIL TEMPS ARE ABOVE 60°F Starting Indoors DO NOT START INDOORS Growing Tips Direct sow your Dill seeds when after the danger of last frost, when the soil temperatures are above 60°F. Culinary Uses Dill is commonly used to as a spice or garnish to compliment many dishes. It can be used fresh cut or dried. Medicinal Uses Dill is also a surprising medicinal plant. Although typically thought of as a spice, most of the Dill plant can be used for medicinal purposes. Dill has been used to aid digestions problems, liver problems, urinary tract disorders, infections, and many other conditions. Some of the chemical compounds produced by the Dill plant may help to relax muscles. Other chemical compounds may be able to fight bacteria and increase urine production similar to a water pill. Additional uses include: Anti-aging, Menstrual Cramps, Cholesterol reduction, Labor Pains, Bronchitis, Colds, Cough, Digestive Tract Problems, Fever Reducer, Gallbladder Problems, Infections, Intestinal Gas, Liver Problems, Loss of Appetite, Sleep Disorders, Sore Mouth and Throat, Spasms, UTI, and other conditions. Harvesting Crops Harvest from your plant regularly to keep it from flowering and going to seed too soon. Harvesting Seed Allow some of your plants to develop flowers and seeds. Wait until the seeds turn brown and the clusters grow heavier. (Plants may need staked to keep seeds high off ground) Use a paper bag to collect your seed head clippings. Store them in a warm, dry place for a couple weeks. Safely store your dried seeds for next season.
Echinacea - Purple Coneflower
Echinacea - Purple Coneflower $3.49
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Echinacea Variety: Purple Coneflower Family: Asteraceae Botanical Name: Echinacea purpurea Hardiness Zones: 3,4,5,6,7,8,9 Growing Difficulty:  3 Soil PH:  6.0 to 7.0 Fertilizer Requirements:  None Soil Type: Normal, Sandy or Clay Germination (days): 10 to 30 Soil Temp for Germination: 65-70°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN Days to Maturity:  90 - 120 Planting Depth:  1/8-1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  12-24" Row Spacing: 12-24" Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN FULL SUN IN FALL (Cold Stratification Required) Starting Indoors START INDOORS 6-8 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST (Cold Stratification Required) Growing Tips Echinacea seeds require cold stratification prior to germination. This can be done one of two ways (depending on your planting method). When Planting Outdoors, plant the echinacea seeds in the fall to allow the seeds to overwinter. Seeds will germinate when soil temperatures reach around 65-70°F. Germination should occur within a couple of weeks but could take up to 4 weeks to fully sprout. When Planting Indoors, soak the seeds in water overnight then place the damp seeds in a sealed container in the refrigerator for 8 to 10 weeks. Plant in your seed trays and warm the soil to 65°. Seeds should germinate within 10 to 14 days. These plants are drought-tolerant and do not like soggy feet, so make sure to only water when the surface of the soil is dry to the touch. They do best in a sandy, well-draining soil. Medicinal Uses Echinacea has been used throughout history as an immune-stimulating herb. Medicinally, the leaves, root, and flowers can be used. People have used Echinacea as a natural painkiller for thousands of years. It is also thought to alleviate stomach aches, headaches, sore throats, prevent the common cold, flu, and many respiratory ailments. In addition, echinacea may help to fight rheumatoid arthritis, ulcers, Crohn’s disease, malaria, herpes, typhoid, vaginal yeast, and many other ailments. When used as a tea, echinacea is believed to reduce anxiety and stress. It may also help to control blood sugar levels and is used in many diabetic diets. The list of health benefits from the echinacea plant is ongoing, we recommend harvesting and storing the entire plant for future uses as the need arises. Harvesting Crops Echinacea flowers and leaves can be harvested in as little as three months but may not reach full maturity until 4 months of solid growth. If you plan to use the roots in medicinal recipes, most commercial productions wait until the third year of growth to harvest the entire root ball for use. This allows the roots to develop to absolute maturity. Although, the rest of the plant can be selectively harvested until this point. Harvesting Seed Save some of your strongest echinacea plants to use as seed stock in the first year. These will provide the best prospects for germinating from seed. When the flowers have reached full maturity (around 3-4 months), the petals will begin to die off and turn brown. Once the seed heads begin to die and turn a dark brown color, your seeds are ready to harvest. Snip the stems just below the seed heads and use a bucket or bowl to collect the seeds as you brush them out of the seed head with your fingers. Echinacea seeds are incredibly small, so be careful when removing them. Make sure your seeds are completely dry by storing them in a cool, dry area for a couple of weeks before safely storing them for next growing season.
St. Johns Wort
St. Johns Wort $3.49
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: St. Johns Wort Variety: Common Family: Hypericaceae            Botanical Name: Hypericum perforatum Hardiness Zones: 5,6,7,8,9,10 Growing Difficulty:  5         Soil PH:  4.5 to 8.0 Fertilizer Requirements: 20-20-20 Soil Type: Any Type Germination (days): 10 to 20             Soil Temp for Germination: 60-70°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN, PART SHADE Days to Maturity:  90 - 120 Planting Depth:  1/10” Distance Apart (in row):  8 - 12” Row Spacing: 12 - 18” Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN FULL SUN WHEN SOIL TEMPS ARE ABOVE 60°F Starting Indoors 6-8 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST, SOW ON SURFACE, TRANSPLANT WHEN 2-3” TALL Growing Tips St. Johns Wort can be a tricky plant to grow but is valuable when established. Start by sowing the seeds on the surface of the soil in the Fall or Early Spring. These plants will not require much in the way of maintenance, as they are actually a weed that will be around indefinitely once they become established. St. Johns Wort does not need replanted every year and is a perennial plant in the appropriate growing zones. This plant enjoys a mix of sun and shade. Too much sun will damage the plant, whereas too much shade will inhibit the growth. Make sure the plant has shade during the hottest part of the afternoon sun. Culinary Uses Most people think of St Johns Wort as a medicinal herb, but it can be used in fresh salads as well. Try using some fresh flowers as an edible garnish that adds a bit of color to your salad. Medicinal Uses St. Johns Wort has been used as a medicinal plant since the ancient Greek times. The name itself refers to John the Baptist. This plant is used for a variety of conditions, including kidney problems, lung ailments, depression, and insomnia, as well as an aid in healing wounds. St. Johns Wort is sold as a dietary supplement with its most notable cure as an anti-depressant. You may also find that St Johns Wort helps with menopausal symptoms, ADHD, obsessive compulsive disorders, and more. Harvesting Crops St. Johns Wort is harvested for the flowers. You can simply pick the fresh flowers and buds or even cut the top several inches off the plant when in full bloom (June/Early July). Make sure to avoid the use of pesticides on these plants. Harvesting Seed The seed of the St Johns Wort plant matures in the early fall. Wait until the flower has turned brown and the seed capsule has turned brown and dry. Harvest the seed capsules and break them in your hands to reveal the seeds. Allow the seeds to dry thoroughly before safely storing for planting during your next growing season.
Nasturtium - Jewel Mix
Nasturtium - Jewel Mix $4.29
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Flower Type: Nasturtium Variety: Jewel Mix Family: Tropaeolaceae          Botanical Name: Tropaeolum majus Hardiness Zones: 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11 Growing Difficulty:  3         Soil PH:  6.0 to 8.0 Fertilizer Requirements: None Soil Type: Moderately Fertile, Moist, Well-Draining Germination (days): 10 to 12 Soil Temp for Germination: 55-65°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN, PART SHADE Days to Maturity:  35 – 52 Planting Depth:  1/2” Distance Apart (in row):  10-12" Row Spacing: 12-24" Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN FULL SUN WHEN SOIL TEMPS ARE ABOVE 55°F Starting Indoors 4-6 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST Growing Tips Nasturtium prefers poor soil, so it's typically an easy plant to grow. Be sure to soak your Nasturtium seeds in water overnight or about 12 hours to help the seedlings break through the thick outer shell. Some growers even knick the seed hull with nail clippers prior to soaking. Generally, an annual plant, but considered a perennial in zones 9 through 11. Culinary Uses Nasturtium is an edible flower that can be eaten for a spicy mustard green type of flavor. Simply pluck the flowers and add them to your salads for a colorful and complex flavor. Companion Uses Many gardeners use Nasturtium to encourage butterflies and pollinating insects to visit their gardens. However, it is also used as a beneficial companion plant for most vegetable varieties. Nasturtiums are known to deter aphids, whiteflies, cucumber beetles and a variety of other garden pests. Harvesting Crops Pluck the flower heads and harvest the leaves for a variety of edible uses. You can even use the seeds as an alternative to capers. Harvesting Seed Allow the nasturtiums pea sized seeds to mature on the plant. They will dry out on the vine and eventually fall off. Once they fall off, collect them and dust the dirt off. Dry the seeds for a few weeks in a cool dry place and safely store them for use in the next growing season.
Cosmos - Bright Lights
Cosmos - Bright Lights $3.39
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Cosmos - Bright Lights flowers are easy to grow and butterflies love them. They are a drought tolerant flower and can tolerate poor soil. This makes Cosmos an excellent choice for first time or even experienced gardeners. Add a little color indoors as well, Cosmos make great cutting flowers with lasting blooms that display well.  Category: Flower Type: Cosmos Variety: Bright Lights Family: Cosmos sulphureus  Botanical Name: Sulfur cosmos Hardiness Zones: 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11 Growing Difficulty:  2         Soil PH:  5.5 to 7.5 Fertilizer Requirements:  None Soil Type: Loamy, Avg Moisture, Well-Drained Germination (days): 7 to 14 Soil Temp for Germination: 70-80°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN Days to Maturity:  80 – 90 Planting Depth:  1/8” Distance Apart (in row):  12-18" Row Spacing: 18-24" Cosmos Planting Instructions Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW WHEN SOIL TEMPERATURE IS ABOVE 65°F Starting Indoors 4-6 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST Growing Tips If sown outdoors, seeds may be simply raked into a row. If planting in cells, cover the seeds lightly with about a 1/16th - 1/8th inch of dirt. Keep moist until germination occurs (7 - 14 days). Common Uses Cosmos are beneficial flowers to keep certain garden pests away. Used in companion planting, they will not only add a beautiful display of color to your garden but protect your other garden plants. Crops Pick the flowers to add as a garnish to salads or meat dishes. Harvesting Seed Harvest Cosmos seed when the flowers head has died. Pluck the heads off and place them into a paper bag. Shake the flower heads in the bag to harvest the loose seeds.
Anise Seeds
Anise - Pimpinella Anisum $3.29
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Anise Variety: Pimpinella Anisum Family: Apiaceae Botanical Name: Pimpinella Anisum Hardiness Zones: 4,5,6,7,8,9 Growing Difficulty:  3 Soil PH:  5.0 – 7.0 Fertilizer Requirements:  None Soil Type: Poor to Rich, Well Drained Soil, Tolerates Dry Conditions Germination (days): 4 - 14 Soil Temp for Germination: 70 – 75°F Lighting Conditions: Full Sun Days to Maturity:  100 - 120 Planting Depth:  1/8” Distance Apart (in row):  6-18” Row Spacing: 18-24”   Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW WHEN SOIL TEMPS ARE ABOVE 65°F Starting Indoors DO NOT START INDOORS Anise Growing Tips This herb does not transplant well, so expect to leave it in a permanent container or plant directly in the garden. Plant seeds 6 - 18" apart, and thin to 18" once established. Water regularly until the Anise is established. Once established, this plant can tolerate periods of drought and does not like soggy roots. Culinary Uses Traditionally used in licorice flavoring, but also widely used in alcohols, dairy products, liqueurs, meats, candies, etc... The essential oil of Aniseed is used medicinally as well as in body products such as perfume, soaps, lotions and more. Anise Medicinal Uses Anise is commonly used in many food and drug applications. The smell and taste of Aniseed should remind you of a black licorice (as this is typically where licorice gets its flavoring). This herb has been cultivated over the last 4,000 years for use as a diuretic and for treatment of digestive problems as well as a cure for toothaches. In Greek history, aniseed was thought to help breathing, be a pain reliever, increase urine production and ease thirst. Additional medical uses of Aniseed include using it as an expectorant. In high doses, it can be used as an antispasmodic and antiseptic. Used widely for the treatment of cough, asthma, and bronchitis. You will also find that it is commonly used as a treatment for lice, scabies, and psoriasis. Note - Do not use if you are pregnant or expect to become pregnant. Harvesting Anise Seed Harvest Anise seed when the flowers head has turned mostly dry and brown. Cut the heads off with enough stem to hang them upside down in a cool dry area for several weeks. Place a cloth below your hung plants to catch the seeds that will ripen and dry out naturally.
Chamomile - German
Chamomile - German $3.59
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Chamomile Variety: German Family: Daisy Botanical Name: Matricaria Chamomilla Hardiness Zones: 3,4,5,6,7,8,9 Growing Difficulty:  2 Soil PH:  5.6 to 7.5 Fertilizer Requirements:  None Soil Type: Rich, Dry, Well-Draining Germination (days): 7 to 14 Soil Temp for Germination: 65-85°F Lighting Conditions:  Partial Shade/Full Sun Days to Maturity:  60 – 90      Planting Depth:  Surface Distance Apart (in row): 4-6" Row Spacing: 6-12"   Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN FULL SUN AFTER LAST FROST Starting Indoors 4-6 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST Growing Tips Chamomile grows best in cool and partly shaded areas. Soil should be mostly dry and does not need fertilizer as this can cause weak foliage and fewer flowers. Do not fret about a missed watering, this powerful plant is drought tolerant and does not require much water. Culinary Uses Chamomile leaves tend to be bitter and should be used sparingly but are edible. The blossoms are sweet and are great for desserts like ice cream, custard, and baking. Flowers are also a great garnish or used to add a flavorful statement in salads. Medicinal Uses Chamomile is thought to be able to treat upset stomach and assist as a natural sleep aid. Often found in soaps, lotions and cosmetics, Chamomile is credited with being a great skin care herb. When distilled into an oil, it is often used as an antiseptic, anti-inflammatory and anti-fungal. Harvesting Crops Chamomile flowers will bloom all summer, allowing for a bountiful harvest. The flowers are ready once they fully open (unlike calendula). Simply pluck the flower head from the stem and allow it to dry in an airy environment, away from sunlight. If the flowers are left too long, this annual plant with self-seed and may surprise you with many new starts the next year. Harvesting Seed Once the flowers are done blooming, the seeds should be visible. Harvest the seeds by placing the flower heads in a brown paper bag and shaking. They should easily fall out of the flower heads and once separated from the chaff, all that is left is to store them in a cool dry place until next growing season.
Pacific Beauty Calendula Seeds
Calendula - Pacific Beauty $3.79
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Flower Type: Calendula Variety: Pacific Beauty Family: Daisy Botanical Name: Calendula officinalis Hardiness Zones: 3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 Growing Difficulty:  2 Soil PH:  6.0 to 7.0 Fertilizer Requirements:  Liquid bloom Soil Type: Rich, Average, Well-Draining, Organic Germination (days): 5 to 15 Soil Temp for Germination: 68-85°F Lighting Conditions: Full Sun Days to Maturity:  60 – 90    Planting Depth:  1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  10-15" Row Spacing: 12-18"   Sowing Instructions 2-4 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST Starting Indoors 6-8 WEEKS BEFORE DANGER OF LAST FROST Growing Tips Calendula Pacific Beauty is an easy growing seed, especially when started indoors before last frost. Calendula grows good with vegetables and are great companions for peas, carrots, and tomatoes. Soil should be rich and well drained. Calendula can tolerate poor conditions but prefers nourishing soil. Culinary Uses Calendula is often used as a natural food dye. The flowers are great edible garnish in many dishes and can often be found gracing a gourmet cuisine with their elegance. Great for decoration of cakes (especially wedding cakes) and other desserts. Medicinal Uses This beautiful flower also packs a great Medicinal Punch. From the ability to strengthen the immune system to improving digestion, this plant is often used as a tea to treat a wide variety of symptoms. Calendula is thought to be an anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial plant. It has been known to treat skin conditions like rashes, dry skin, and eczema. Known as a “healing” plant, it can also help with wound healing, insect bites, bruises, and cuts. As a tea, Calendula is thought to help treat a sore throat or sores of the mouth. Calendula has also been found to slow development of wrinkles and hydrate skin. Harvesting Crops You should begin to harvest the blossoms of the Calendula flower when they are just partially open. This is the point of growth that contains the most medicinal properties. Lopping the flower head from the stalk makes for a steadier harvest of blooms throughout the entire growing season. The more often you harvest, the more blooms each plant will produce. Drying Flowers: You should provide plenty of air circulation and protection from the sun while drying your calendula flowers. Spread them out evenly and DO NOT WASH THEM. Allow your flowers to dry completely before processing into medicine or tea. You will know the flowers are dried completely when they are no longer difficult to grind between your fingers. Harvesting Seed Choose your BEST FLOWERS for your seed harvesting. These are likely to produce the highest quality seeds at the peak of maturity. Allow the flower heads to dry on the plant. Once the seed head is completely dried, gently remove the seeds from the head. Note: If the seeds do not easily break free, they are not ready to be harvested. Store your newly collected seeds in a cool dry place for the next growing season.
Achillea Golden Yellow Yarrow Seeds
Achillea - Golden Yarrow $5.59
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability   Category: Herb Type: Perennials Variety: Golden Yarrow Family: Asteraceae (Sunflower) Botanical Name: Eriophyllum Conferiflorum Hardiness Zones: 3,4,5,6,7,8,9 Growing Difficulty:  3 Soil PH:  4.0-8.0 Fertilizer Requirements:  Compost Soil Type: Sandy, Loamy, Hot Dry Conditions Germination (days): 14-21 Soil Temp for Germination: 70 – 75°F Lighting Conditions: Full Sun Days to Maturity:  65-100 Planting Depth:  1/16” Distance Apart (in row):  16” Row Spacing: 16”   Sowing Instructions Direct Sow Not Recommended Starting Indoors 8-10 Weeks Before Last Frost Growing Tips Plant in an area that receives full sun and well drained. Thrives in hot conditions. Does not tolerate constant wet conditions. Pant seeds 16” apart and 1/16” deep. Planting in partial sun will cause Yarrow to grow leggy. Yarrow is quick to establish and spread. Culinary Uses Yarrow has a strong flavor and should be used sparingly. Yarrow leaves are great for tea, salads and soups. Can also be used for beer as a substitute for hops. Yarrow leaves or the whole plant should be kept in glass of water and will keep 2-3 days can last a week in the refrigerator. Medicinal Uses Yarrow has been used a fever reducer and helps shorten the duration of cold and flu. It helps relieve stomach cramps and applied topically can help with skin rashes or itching. Yarrow has also been used to stop bleeding, lower high blood pressure and help improve circulation. Yarrow tea can help reduce nausea and headaches as well as fevers.  Yarrow has antimicrobial actions and is a natural source for flavoring foods. Yarrow oil has numerous healing affects. It has been known as an anti-inflammatory, astringent, digestive health, hypotensive and skin benefits. There is no clinical data that the use of yarrow can treat medical conditions. Note: Do not use if pregnant or plan to become pregnant or while breastfeeding. Harvesting Seed Harvest after the flowers are open and still bright. Cut entire stem half way down. Tie them together and hang out of direct sun. When dry garble and store in a mason jar. Yarrow can last in storage and will keep for a year or more.
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Feverfew
Feverfew $4.19
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Feverfew Variety: Common Family: Asteraceae Botanical Name: Tanacetum parthenium Hardiness Zones: 5,6,7,8,9,10 Growing Difficulty:  3 Soil PH:  6.0 to 6.7 Fertilizer Requirements:  None Soil Type: Well-Draining, Sand Loam Germination (days): 10 to 14 Soil Temp for Germination: 64-68°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN, PART SHADE Days to Maturity:  100 - 110      Planting Depth:  1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  12-18" Row Spacing: 12 18"   Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN FULL SUN WHEN SOIL TEMPS ARE ABOVE 60°F Starting Indoors 6 - 8 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST Growing Tips These plants love a well-drained or sandy loam soil but will tolerate other soil types as well. You may begin direct sowing in your garden after danger of all frost has passed but may also start indoors for an earlier crop. Feverfew transplants well when allowed to acclimate to its growing temperature and environment prior to transplanting. Keep the soil moist, but not overly saturated and your feverfew will do fine. Do not let your soil go for extended periods without watering though, as it will inhibit growth of your feverfew. DO NOT PLANT IN VEGETABLE GARDENS or near other flowering plants that require bees for pollination. Feverfew is repellent of many insects, including bees. This makes feverfew a great plant for patio and poolside decoration but will be detrimental to your vegetable garden if planted among fruit or vegetable producing plants. Culinary Uses Italian chefs often use feverfew leaves as a garnish in dishes such as fried eggs. Chopped feverfew may also add a bitter yet aromatic flavor to many salads, soups, and sauces. You may also find that the leaves and flowers make a beautiful plate garnish. Medicinal Uses The Feverfew plant is a widely used medicinal plant that has been used for centuries to aid in many different medical ailments. Some of the medicinal benefits of this plant may help with/as: Fever Reducer, Menstrual Pain, Allergy Relief, Anti-Inflammatory, Arthritis Pain, Asthma Attacks, Dizziness, Nausea, infertility , Vomiting, Upset Stomach, and Tinnitus. Feverfew is commonly used as an Anti-Cancer herb, and cough suppressant. When taken as a preventative medication, Feverfew has also been known to help those that suffer from Migraine Headaches. Many studies have been completed on Feverfew for the effects of migraine relief with positive effects reported. Harvesting Crops Feverfew is a second-year producer. You will want to harvest the plants flowers once they are in full bloom in the second year of growth. Make sure not to harvest more than a third of the plant at one time, otherwise the plant may die. Spray the plant with water the evening before harvest. Cut the stems with flowers leaving at least 4 inches for the plant to grow a second harvest later in the year. We recommend using your feverfew fresh for many medicinal uses, but it may also be dried and stored for later use by laying flat and allowing to dry in a dry, dark, ventilated area. Harvesting Seed In the second year of growth, allow some of your plants to develop fully without harvesting the flowers. Once the blooms have died, harvest the plant, and spread your seeds in a cool dry area to fully dry. Once dried (1-3 weeks), store your seeds in an airtight container until next year.
Bachelor Button Seeds
Bachelors Button $3.49
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability   Category: Flower Type: Bachelors Button Variety: Mixed Colors Family: Cornflowers Botanical Name: Centaurea cyanus Hardiness Zones: 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11 Growing Difficulty:  1 Soil PH:  6.6 – 7.8 Fertilizer Requirements:  Compost Soil Type: Well drained/Alkaline Germination (days): 7 – 14 Soil Temp for Germination: 60-70°F Lighting Conditions: Full Sun/Partial Days to Maturity:  85-90 Planting Depth:  1/2” Distance Apart (in row):  6-12” Row Spacing: 6-12” Sowing Instructions Full Sun After last frost Starting Indoors 4-6 weeks before last frost Growing Tips Cover seed with 1/2” soil and keep dark to germinate. Bachelors Button is pretty drought resistant and will self-care once started. Culinary Uses Bachelors has a sweet and spicy taste and is a natural food dye. They are mostly used as a garnish and are often used to add color to teas. Bachelors Buttons are also Great for decoration of cakes and other desserts. Medicinal Uses This unsuspecting little flower packs a great medicinal punch as well. Bachelors Button has a great anti-inflammatory property and are excellent when used as an oral rinsing agent as a tincture. They may help with sore and bleeding gums. It is believed that Bachelors Button can be used to help with UTI infections as well as detoxifying the liver. Not to mention, they are also a great remedy for occasional constipation and stomach ulcers. Harvest Crops Depending on your desired use of this beautiful plant, you may be harvesting the flowers, the stem, and leaves, or both. We recommend deadheading the plants to trick them into producing flowers until the cool weather comes. Simply remove the blooms as they start to wilt by using pruning shears, or simply plucking with your fingernails to snip the stems below the wilted flower. If you are harvesting the flower for medicinal purposes or to use as a garnish or natural food dye, use pruning shears or scissors to cut the freshly full bloomed flower head (not wilted). For medicinal purposes of harvesting the stem and leaves, first harvest your bloomed flower head and cut your stem down to no lower than 3 inches above the base. You may use this portion of the stem for a variety of medicinal salves and poultices. Harvesting Seeds Bind flowers that are brown and hang upside down over a bag or cloth. Dry completely for a few weeks. When they are crisp rub the base of each flower to release seeds. Store in airtight jars for next season.  
Achillea White Yarrow Seeds
Achillea - White Yarrow $3.79
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability   Category: Herb Type: Achillea Variety: White Yarrow Family: Asteraceae Botanical Name: Achillea millefolium Hardiness Zones: 3,4,5,6,7,8,9 Growing Difficulty:  3 Soil PH:  4.0-8.0 Fertilizer Requirements:  Compost Soil Type: Chalk, Loam, Sand, Hot Dry Conditions Germination (days): 14-21 Soil Temp for Germination: 70 – 75°F Lighting Conditions: Full Sun Days to Maturity:  65-100 Planting Depth:  1/16” Distance Apart (in row):  16” Row Spacing: 16”   Sowing Instructions Direct sow not recommended. Starting Indoors Start Yarrow indoors 8-10 weeks before last frost Growing Tips Plant in an area that receives full sun and well drained. Thrives in hot conditions. Does not tolerate constant wet conditions. Pant seeds 16” apart and 1/16” deep. Planting in partial sun will cause Yarrow to grow leggy. Yarrow is quick to establish and spread. Culinary Uses Yarrow has a strong flavor and should be used sparingly. Yarrow leaves are great for tea, salads, and soups. Can also be used for beer as a substitute for hops. Yarrow leaves or the whole plant should be kept in glass of water and will keep 2-3 days can last a week in the refrigerator. Medicinal Uses Yarrow has been used a fever reducer and helps shorten the duration of cold and flu. It helps relieve stomach cramps and applied topically can help with skin rashes or itching. Yarrow has also been used to stop bleeding, lower high blood pressure, and help improve circulation. Yarrow tea can help reduce nausea and headaches as well as fevers. Yarrow has antimicrobial actions and is a natural source for flavoring foods. Yarrow oil has numerous healing affects. It has been known as an anti-inflammatory, astringent, digestive health, hypotensive and skin benefits. There is no clinical data that the use of yarrow can treat medical conditions. Note: Do not use if pregnant or plan to become pregnant or while breastfeeding. Harvesting Seed Harvest after the flowers are open and still bright. Cut entire stem halfway down. Tie them together and hang out of direct sun. When dry garble and store in a mason jar. Yarrow can last in storage and will keep for a year or more.