Basil Sweet Genovese Seeds
Basil - Genovese $3.29
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Basil Variety: Genovese Family: Lamiaceae Botanical Name: Ocimum Basilicum Hardiness Zones: 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11 Growing Difficulty:  3 Soil PH:  6.0 – 6.5 Fertilizer Requirements:  14-14-14 Soil Type: Moist, Well-Draining Germination (days): 5 – 14  Soil Temp for Germination: 70°F Lighting Conditions: Full Sun Days to Maturity:  60 – 90 Planting Depth:  1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  6-10” Row Spacing: 30-36”   Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW AFTER DANGER OF LAST FROST Starting Indoors 6-8 WEEKS BEFORE DANGER OF LAST FROST Growing Tips Genovese Basil prefer to grow in rich, fertile soil with at least six hours of sunlight per day. It is best to grow in a rich compost instead of fertilizer, as Basil will become bitter and less potent when grown with artificial fertilizers. Perennial in zones 10 and above. Culinary Uses Genovese Basil is commonly used as an herb in many Italian and Mexican dishes. You will find a variety of uses to flavor pesto, caprise salad and many other dishes that would be complimented by large fresh basil leaves. Medicinal Uses Basil is often used in medicine to treat digestion and liver problems. It can help to detoxify the body and works as a natural anti-inflammatory and anti-depressant. Headache and migraine sufferers also praise the Basil plants healing ability. Basil is also commonly used to treat wounds and skin conditions. Harvesting Crops Continually pinch fresh leaves off the Basil plant to encourage a bushier production and prevent it from flowering too soon. You can harvest basil plants continually through the summer months if properly maintained. Harvesting Seed Allow the Basil to bolt and begin flowering. At this point, the basil plant will stop producing new leaves and the energy used will be to produce new flowers and seeds. The seeds are found in the spent flower head. It is best to use a fine colander, as the basil seeds are very small. Cut off the spent flower heads and allow them to dry for several days in a warm dry location. Crush the flower heads over the colander and pick out the flower remnants to be left with just seeds.
Sold out
Cilantro - Coriander
Cilantro - Coriander $3.79
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Cilantro Variety: Coriander Family: Umbellifers Botanical Name: Coriandrum sativum Hardiness Zones: 3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11 Growing Difficulty:  5         Soil PH:  6.5 to 7.5 Fertilizer Requirements:  10-10-10 Soil Type: Rich, Lightly Moist, Well-Draining Germination (days): 7 to 10 Soil Temp for Germination: 55-70°F Lighting Conditions: PART SUN, INDIRECT SUN Days to Maturity:  21 – 28 Planting Depth:  1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  6" Row Spacing: 12"   Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN LATE SPRING OR EARLY SUMMER Starting Indoors DO NOT START INDOORS Growing Tips In climates 3 to 8 cilantro is planted in the spring, but in zones 9 to 11, the herb is planted in fall or winter. As soon as your plant starts to mature, immediately begin harvesting the leaves. Cilantro is a quick grower, but also quick to flower. Once cilantro flowers, the flavor changes quickly and all of the plants energy will be put into seed production. To have a continual fresh harvest of cilantro, we recommend making successive sowings about every 2 to 3 weeks starting in late spring. Culinary Uses Cilantro is commonly used in Mexican, Indian, African, Spanish, Russian, and Chinese cuisines. Medicinal Uses Cilantro (aka coriander) is commonly used around the world for many medicinal purposes. These uses include digestion problems such as upset stomach, appetite loss, hernia, nausea, diarrhea, bowel spasms, as well as gas. Other claimed remedies are measles, hemorrhoids, toothaches, worms, arthritis and joint pain, as well as bacterial and fungal infections. Harvesting Crops You can start to harvest your Cilantro leaves when the plant is about 3 to 4 weeks old. Regular taking of leaves will keep the plant producing regularly. Harvesting Seed If the plant is left to grow untouched, you can expect to start harvesting the seeds in about 45 days. We recommend planting a few cilantro plants specifically for seed harvesting.
Oregano - Italian
Oregano - Italian $3.59
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Oregano Variety: Italian Family: Lamiaceae Botanical Name: Origanum vulgare Hardiness Zones: 5,6,7,8,9,10 Growing Difficulty:  3         Soil PH:  6.0 to 9.0 Fertilizer Requirements: None          Soil Type: Average to Rich, Well-Draining Germination (days): 10 - 15 Soil Temp for Germination: 60-70°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN, PART SHADE Days to Maturity:  80 - 90 Planting Depth:  1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  6" Row Spacing: 18 - 24" Starting Indoors 2-6 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST Growing Tips Oregano is a simple to grow herb that compliments any garden. When growing from seed, plant outdoors about 6 weeks before last frost. If you are planting from a seedling (started indoors) make sure the soil temperature is as least 70°F. Oregano enjoys well drained and moderately fertile soil. There is no need to add fertilizer. This variety has the best flavor when grown in full sun, but it will tolerate partial shade. Watering is only required when soil is dry to the touch. Culinary Uses Oregano goes great in many cuisines and sauces such as pizza sauce, pasta sauce, olive oil-based dishes and vinaigrettes. Medicinal Uses Oregano is used medicinally for its bacteria fighting properties, anti-cancer, antioxidants, anti-viral, and anti-inflammatory properties. Some other common uses include skin sores, muscle aches, asthma, cramping, diarrhea, indigestion, colds and immune boosting. Harvesting Crops Wait until the stems are at least 4 inches tall to begin harvesting your Oregano. You can use the leaves by themselves to flavor dishes or cut the stems and dry them to save as dried herbs. Harvesting Seed Wait until the oregano flowers and the flowers begin to dry. Clip the flowers (on stem) and bundle them together. Rubber band the stems and hang them upside down to dry for 2-3 weeks. Once the flowers are completely dried, shake the flower heads in a paper bag to loosen any seeds that are still left inside the flowers. Safely store and save for next season. Note - When properly cared for, the Oregano plant will come back year after year without having to replant.
Sold out
Dill - Common
Dill - Common $3.29
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Dill Variety: Common Family: Apiaceae Botanical Name: Anethum graveolens Hardiness Zones: 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11 Growing Difficulty:  2         Soil PH:  5.5 to 6.7 Fertilizer Requirements:  5-10-5 Soil Type: Well Drained, Slightly Acidic Germination (days): 7 to 14 Soil Temp for Germination: 60-70°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN Days to Maturity:  65 – 75    Planting Depth:  1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  12" Row Spacing: 24-36" Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN FULL SUN WHEN SOIL TEMPS ARE ABOVE 60°F Starting Indoors DO NOT START INDOORS Growing Tips Direct sow your Dill seeds when after the danger of last frost, when the soil temperatures are above 60°F. Culinary Uses Dill is commonly used to as a spice or garnish to compliment many dishes. It can be used fresh cut or dried. Medicinal Uses Dill is also a surprising medicinal plant. Although typically thought of as a spice, most of the Dill plant can be used for medicinal purposes. Dill has been used to aid digestions problems, liver problems, urinary tract disorders, infections, and many other conditions. Some of the chemical compounds produced by the Dill plant may help to relax muscles. Other chemical compounds may be able to fight bacteria and increase urine production similar to a water pill. Additional uses include: Anti-aging, Menstrual Cramps, Cholesterol reduction, Labor Pains, Bronchitis, Colds, Cough, Digestive Tract Problems, Fever Reducer, Gallbladder Problems, Infections, Intestinal Gas, Liver Problems, Loss of Appetite, Sleep Disorders, Sore Mouth and Throat, Spasms, UTI, and other conditions. Harvesting Crops Harvest from your plant regularly to keep it from flowering and going to seed too soon. Harvesting Seed Allow some of your plants to develop flowers and seeds. Wait until the seeds turn brown and the clusters grow heavier. (Plants may need staked to keep seeds high off ground) Use a paper bag to collect your seed head clippings. Store them in a warm, dry place for a couple weeks. Safely store your dried seeds for next season.
Lavender - English
Lavender - English $4.28
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Lavender Variety: English Family: Lamiaceae Botanical Name: Lavandula Hardiness Zones: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 Growing Difficulty:  6         Soil PH:  6.5 to 7.5 Fertilizer Requirements: None Soil Type: Moderately Fertile, Well Drained Germination (days): 15 to 20 Soil Temp for Germination: 65-70°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN Days to Maturity:  60 - 65 Planting Depth:  1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  12" Row Spacing: 30-36" Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN FULL SUN WHEN SOIL TEMPS ARE ABOVE 60°F Starting Indoors 6-8 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST Growing Tips In climate zones 1-6, plant in spring or early summer. In climates 7-10, it is recommended to plant in the fall to get root systems established during the cooler temperatures. Lavender prefers fast draining soil and does not like soggy roots. Only water (once established) when the ground becomes very dry. Culinary Uses Believe it or not, lavender is a great flavoring aid in many foods and beverages. Try it in some homemade ice cream for a delectable treat. Medicinal Uses Lavender is commonly used as a medicinal ingredient in many herbal remedies. Some of these include anxiety, stress, insomnia, depression, dementia, pain after surgery, and many more. Additional Uses Believe it or not, lavender is also a great flavoring aid in many foods and beverages. Try it in some homemade ice cream for a delectable treat. Harvesting Crops Lavender is best when harvested when the buds have formed, but the flowers have not yet opened. The closed buds will retain their fragrance longer for use in many crafts and recipes. Harvesting Seed Harvesting lavender seed is straight forward. Wait until the lavender blooms have died and begin to turn brown. The seed head will develop in this stage and once the seed head matures it may burst and scatter the seeds. We suggest harvesting the stalks as soon as you see the first signs of seed heads bursting and immediately hanging the stalks upside down in a paper bag to collect the matured seeds. Allow the seeds to dry thoroughly over the course of a couple weeks and store properly for the next growing season.
Thyme - Common
Thyme - Common $3.69
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Thyme Variety: Common Family: Mints        Botanical Name: Thymus vulgaris Hardiness Zones: 3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 Growing Difficulty:  3         Soil PH:  6.0 to 8.0 Fertilizer Requirements: 10-10-10 Soil Type: Rich, Moist, Well-Draining Germination (days): 14 to 28             Soil Temp for Germination: 60-70°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN Days to Maturity:  65 - 75 Planting Depth:  1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  12” Row Spacing: 16 - 24” Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN FULL SUN WHEN SOIL TEMPS ARE ABOVE 60°F Starting Indoors START INDOORS 6-10 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST Growing Tips Thyme can be difficult to start from seeds because of uneven germination and sensitivity to growing conditions. Once you’ve started plants, it is best to take cuttings and transplant to increase your crops. Plant your cuttings or transplant your starts any time after the ground temperatures reach 70°F. Make sure to plant your Thyme between 9-12” apart in rows. We recommend to companion plant your Thyme with cabbage or tomatoes. Culinary Uses Thyme is another herb that is commonly found in many Mediterranean cuisines. Use it to season soups, braises, or sauces. You can also use it in potatoes and rice dishes, or even with vegetables and fresh bread recipes. Harvesting Crops We recommend that you harvest your Thyme just before it blooms for the most flavor. Cut stems just before a growth node and wrap in bunches to dry and use for seasoning. If stems are cut before the growth node, this will encourage the plant to continue bushing and provide an ample supply of fresh thyme all season long. We have found that harvesting thyme in the morning is the best for flavor. Harvesting Seed Allow thyme to fully mature and produce seed heads. As the seed heads mature, they will begin to dry out. Pick the seed heads off the plant and allow them to dry out of direct sunlight. Thrush the seeds in your hands to remove the seed. Store in a cool, dry place.
Echinacea - Purple Coneflower
Echinacea - Purple Coneflower $3.49
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Echinacea Variety: Purple Coneflower Family: Asteraceae Botanical Name: Echinacea purpurea Hardiness Zones: 3,4,5,6,7,8,9 Growing Difficulty:  3 Soil PH:  6.0 to 7.0 Fertilizer Requirements:  None Soil Type: Normal, Sandy or Clay Germination (days): 10 to 30 Soil Temp for Germination: 65-70°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN Days to Maturity:  90 - 120 Planting Depth:  1/8-1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  12-24" Row Spacing: 12-24" Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN FULL SUN IN FALL (Cold Stratification Required) Starting Indoors START INDOORS 6-8 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST (Cold Stratification Required) Growing Tips Echinacea seeds require cold stratification prior to germination. This can be done one of two ways (depending on your planting method). When Planting Outdoors, plant the echinacea seeds in the fall to allow the seeds to overwinter. Seeds will germinate when soil temperatures reach around 65-70°F. Germination should occur within a couple of weeks but could take up to 4 weeks to fully sprout. When Planting Indoors, soak the seeds in water overnight then place the damp seeds in a sealed container in the refrigerator for 8 to 10 weeks. Plant in your seed trays and warm the soil to 65°. Seeds should germinate within 10 to 14 days. These plants are drought-tolerant and do not like soggy feet, so make sure to only water when the surface of the soil is dry to the touch. They do best in a sandy, well-draining soil. Medicinal Uses Echinacea has been used throughout history as an immune-stimulating herb. Medicinally, the leaves, root, and flowers can be used. People have used Echinacea as a natural painkiller for thousands of years. It is also thought to alleviate stomach aches, headaches, sore throats, prevent the common cold, flu, and many respiratory ailments. In addition, echinacea may help to fight rheumatoid arthritis, ulcers, Crohn’s disease, malaria, herpes, typhoid, vaginal yeast, and many other ailments. When used as a tea, echinacea is believed to reduce anxiety and stress. It may also help to control blood sugar levels and is used in many diabetic diets. The list of health benefits from the echinacea plant is ongoing, we recommend harvesting and storing the entire plant for future uses as the need arises. Harvesting Crops Echinacea flowers and leaves can be harvested in as little as three months but may not reach full maturity until 4 months of solid growth. If you plan to use the roots in medicinal recipes, most commercial productions wait until the third year of growth to harvest the entire root ball for use. This allows the roots to develop to absolute maturity. Although, the rest of the plant can be selectively harvested until this point. Harvesting Seed Save some of your strongest echinacea plants to use as seed stock in the first year. These will provide the best prospects for germinating from seed. When the flowers have reached full maturity (around 3-4 months), the petals will begin to die off and turn brown. Once the seed heads begin to die and turn a dark brown color, your seeds are ready to harvest. Snip the stems just below the seed heads and use a bucket or bowl to collect the seeds as you brush them out of the seed head with your fingers. Echinacea seeds are incredibly small, so be careful when removing them. Make sure your seeds are completely dry by storing them in a cool, dry area for a couple of weeks before safely storing them for next growing season.
Chives - Common
Chives - Common $3.49
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Chives Variety: Common Family: Amaryllidaceae  Botanical Name: Allium schoenoprasum Hardiness Zones: 3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 Growing Difficulty:  2         Soil PH:  6.0 to 7.0 Fertilizer Requirements:  5-10-5 Soil Type: Rich, Moist, Well-Draining Germination (days): 7 to 21 Soil Temp for Germination: 60-70°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN, PART SHADE Days to Maturity:  60 – 90      Planting Depth:  1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  6" Row Spacing: 12-24"   Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW AFTER DANGER OF LAST FROST Starting Indoors 8-10 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST Growing Tips Chives do well anywhere in the garden and are commonly used as a decorative plant that is also edible. Chives will grow almost anywhere that receives at least 6 hours of full sun (even indoors with a sunny window). Chives do best when the receive frequent watering and consistently moist soil. Chives are an onion plant that will produce bulbs when left to continuously grow. Every few years, separate the bulbs to continue expanding your chives. Companion planting chives with plants such as carrots, mustard plants, tomatoes, or even cabbage will repel many pests that would otherwise affect these plants. Culinary Uses The entire plant can be used from root to flower, depending on your dish. This herb goes great in mashed potatoes, or as an onion flavor in a meat loaf or gravy. Harvesting Crops Use shears when harvesting your chives. Clip the chive stalks about two inches above the soil starting from the outside in. Do not cut the entire plant, instead you should selectively harvest to keep your chives producing consistently. Harvesting Seed Chives are a perennial herb and will continue to grow year after year. We recommend allowing some of your chives plants to flower and turn brown at the end of their growing season. Chive seeds form inside of the flower heads after the flowers have started to fade and dry out. Allow the flower heads to partially dry on the stalk and clip them a couple inches below the flower. Simply shaking these flower heads into a paper bag will release the seeds. Do not let the flowers fully dry, otherwise the seeds will simply blow away.
Sold out
Arugula Vegetable Seeds
Arugula - Slow Bolt $2.95
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Arugula Variety: Slow Bolt Family: Brassica Botanical Name: Eruca Vesicaria Sativa Hardiness Zones: 3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11 Growing Difficulty:  2 Soil PH:  6.0 – 7.0 Fertilizer Requirements:  None Soil Type: Moist, Well Draining Germination (days): 7 – 10 Soil Temp for Germination: 40 – 55°F Lighting Conditions: Full Sun Days to Maturity:  30 – 50 Planting Depth:  1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  1-6” Row Spacing: 30-36”   Arugula Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW 2 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST Starting Arugula Indoors 8-12 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST Arugula Growing Tips It is usually a good practice to start Arugula plants closer together, thin the weakest plants and allow the strongest to thrive. Use the thinned plants as your earliest harvest in salads or as a garnish. If growing in heat of summer, plant in part shade or use a shade cloth to delay bolting. It is also wise to keep Arugula very well-watered, as it tends to have a shallow root system that is susceptible to drying out. Culinary Uses of Arugula Commonly used in salads or on sandwiches. Arugula Medicinal Uses Arugula was used as an aphrodisiac by both the Romans and Egyptians. The oil produced by pressing the seeds (Taramina oil) is still widely used today. Such uses include hair growth serums, dandruff control, lice and parasite treatment, as well as a topical anti-inflammatory. Harvesting Crops Harvest Arugula continuously for a long lasting and nutritious plant. Cut leaves when they are 2 - 4 inches and leave the center of the plant in-tact. It will continue producing and increase your yield per plant. Harvesting Seed Allow the Arugula to bolt and start producing seed heads. Once the seed heads have matured and the plant is no longer growing, cut the seed head stalks and dry until seeds become too hard to dent with your fingernail. Store in a cool dry place until next season. (Tip: Most Arugula seed will remain viable for six years, even more if you are using proper storage methods)
Sage - Common
Sage - Common $4.39
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Sage Variety: Common Family: Mint          Botanical Name: Salvia officinalis Hardiness Zones: 3,4,5,6,7,8,9 Growing Difficulty:  3         Soil PH:  6.0 to 6.7 Fertilizer Requirements: None Soil Type: Average to Rich, Loamy, Well Drained Germination (days): 14 to 30 Soil Temp for Germination: 65-75°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN Days to Maturity:  75 - 80 Planting Depth:  1/2” Distance Apart (in row):  24-30" Row Spacing: 30-36" Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN FULL SUN WHEN SOIL TEMPS ARE ABOVE 60°F Starting Indoors 6-8 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST Growing Tips We recommend starting your sage indoors about 6-8 weeks before the danger of last frost. The seeds should be sown on the surface of the soil if planting indoors with a soil temperature of about 65-70°F. Keep your soil moist by misting with a spray bottle. The seeds take a while to germinate, and you should start to see sprouts in about 2-3 weeks. The germination rate of these plants is naturally low, so we recommend placing several seeds per cell and thin the varieties after they are about 2-3” tall. Direct sowing is possible, but not recommended since the seeds take a long time to germinate in cooler spring soil. Plant alongside cabbage and carrots to prevent pests. Do not plant sage plants near cucumbers. Culinary Uses Sage is a flavorful ingredient that can really change the flavor of a dull dish. Frying sage will bring out a mellow flavor and can then be crumbled over many dishes to bring out a pop of flavor at the last minute of cooking. Sage is also great to add in sauces, butters, marinades, pastries and even breads. Some people also add sage to cocktails to balance the flavors and bring out a great herbal flavor. Medicinal Uses Sage has been used medicinally for generations. The leaf of the sage plant is the medicinal portion. People use sage for digestive problems, loss of appetite, gas, stomach pain, diarrhea, bloating, and heartburn. You may also use sage to reduce excess sweating and saliva, for depression, memory loss and Alzheimer’s disease. Women have found sage to be a useful herb for painful menstrual periods, reducing excessive milk flow during nursing, reducing hot flashes during menopause. If you have a sore mouth, throat, or tongue, sage can be useful when applied directly. Harvesting Crops Sage, when grown from seed, should not be harvested until its second year of growth. The sage plant must become well established before harvesting to survive as a perennial plant. You can harvest fresh sage leaves at any time, but the best time to harvest is in the mornings after the dew has dried. The best flavor comes right before the plant goes to flower, but once flowering the flavor declines. Sage loses its flavor once heated, so we recommend adding it to your fresh hot dishes immediately before serving. Harvesting Seed Allow your plants to flower and produce seed heads. Harvest these heads individually as soon as they begin to dry. Pick the seed heads and allow them to dry thoroughly for a couple of weeks. Once completely dried, crush the seed heads in your hands to expose the seed. Safely store your seeds in a cool dry place to be used in your next growing season.
St. Johns Wort
St. Johns Wort $3.49
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: St. Johns Wort Variety: Common Family: Hypericaceae            Botanical Name: Hypericum perforatum Hardiness Zones: 5,6,7,8,9,10 Growing Difficulty:  5         Soil PH:  4.5 to 8.0 Fertilizer Requirements: 20-20-20 Soil Type: Any Type Germination (days): 10 to 20             Soil Temp for Germination: 60-70°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN, PART SHADE Days to Maturity:  90 - 120 Planting Depth:  1/10” Distance Apart (in row):  8 - 12” Row Spacing: 12 - 18” Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN FULL SUN WHEN SOIL TEMPS ARE ABOVE 60°F Starting Indoors 6-8 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST, SOW ON SURFACE, TRANSPLANT WHEN 2-3” TALL Growing Tips St. Johns Wort can be a tricky plant to grow but is valuable when established. Start by sowing the seeds on the surface of the soil in the Fall or Early Spring. These plants will not require much in the way of maintenance, as they are actually a weed that will be around indefinitely once they become established. St. Johns Wort does not need replanted every year and is a perennial plant in the appropriate growing zones. This plant enjoys a mix of sun and shade. Too much sun will damage the plant, whereas too much shade will inhibit the growth. Make sure the plant has shade during the hottest part of the afternoon sun. Culinary Uses Most people think of St Johns Wort as a medicinal herb, but it can be used in fresh salads as well. Try using some fresh flowers as an edible garnish that adds a bit of color to your salad. Medicinal Uses St. Johns Wort has been used as a medicinal plant since the ancient Greek times. The name itself refers to John the Baptist. This plant is used for a variety of conditions, including kidney problems, lung ailments, depression, and insomnia, as well as an aid in healing wounds. St. Johns Wort is sold as a dietary supplement with its most notable cure as an anti-depressant. You may also find that St Johns Wort helps with menopausal symptoms, ADHD, obsessive compulsive disorders, and more. Harvesting Crops St. Johns Wort is harvested for the flowers. You can simply pick the fresh flowers and buds or even cut the top several inches off the plant when in full bloom (June/Early July). Make sure to avoid the use of pesticides on these plants. Harvesting Seed The seed of the St Johns Wort plant matures in the early fall. Wait until the flower has turned brown and the seed capsule has turned brown and dry. Harvest the seed capsules and break them in your hands to reveal the seeds. Allow the seeds to dry thoroughly before safely storing for planting during your next growing season.
Sold out
Parsley - Moss Curled
Parsley - Moss Curled $2.95
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Parsley Variety: Moss Curled Family: Apiaceae Botanical Name: Petroselinum crispum Hardiness Zones: 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 Growing Difficulty:  2         Soil PH:  6.5 to 7.0 Fertilizer Requirements: 5-10-5        Soil Type: Rich, Well-Draining Germination (days): 14 to 28 Soil Temp for Germination: 40-65°F Lighting Conditions: FULL SUN, SHADE Days to Maturity:  60 - 70 Planting Depth:  1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  6" Row Spacing: 12 - 18" Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN FULL SUN OR PART SHADE WHEN SOIL TEMPS ARE ABOVE 40°F Starting Indoors 4-6 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST Growing Tips When direct sowing into garden, make sure the soil is rich with compost and worked to a depth of 8". This plant does best in rich, moist, and deep soil with Sun or Part Shade. When starting indoors, soak seeds in warm water overnight. Start in a sunny location 6 weeks before outdoor planting. Culinary Uses Parsley goes great in many cuisines and sauces. Medicinal Uses Parsley has numerous medicinal uses. The leaf, seed and roots of the plant are used to make medicine. Take parsley by mouth for bladder infections, kidney stones, GI disorders, constipation, diabetes, cough, asthma, and even high blood pressure. Harvesting Crops Start harvesting your Parsley when the stems have three or more clusters of leaves. The stems having less than three clusters should be left to grow. Plant parsley every 2 weeks until late spring to have an everlasting crop. Harvesting Seed Parsley plants are Biennial, which means that you will have to wait till the second year to harvest any seeds from your Parsley plant. Bring a couple of Parsley plants indoors if you are in a cold climate and maintain them through the winter (they will continue to provide fresh parsley). Plant them back outside in the early spring and let these plants go to flower. Remember to choose your best plants for saving overwinter. These will provide the healthiest seed stock. Harvest your seed heads when they become dark in color (lighter ones may not germinate). Dry them for several weeks and store them for next season.
Lemon Basil Seeds
Basil - Lemon $3.59
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Basil Variety: Lemon Family: Lamiaceae Botanical Name: Ocimum Basilicum Hardiness Zones: 5,6,7,8,9,10 Growing Difficulty:  3 Soil PH:  5.5 to 7.5 Fertilizer Requirements:  14-14-14 Soil Type: Moist, Well-Draining Germination (days): 8 – 14  Soil Temp for Germination: 70°F Lighting Conditions: Full Sun Days to Maturity:  60 – 90 Planting Depth:  1/4” Distance Apart (in row):  6-10” Row Spacing: 30-36”   Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW AFTER DANGER OF LAST FROST Starting Indoors 6-8 WEEKS BEFORE DANGER OF LAST FROST Growing Tips Lemon Basil, much like other Basil varieties prefer to grow in rich, fertile and loose soils. Do not allow plant to flower until after harvesting is completed. Once the plant flowers, the leaves will become dry and leathery in texture. Culinary Uses Lemon Basil is common in Indian cuisine but has become even more popular in many other recipes around the world. In Laos, it is used extensively in soups, stews, curries and many stir-fried dishes. Great when used in baked goods and to accent flavors in cookies, cakes and other desserts. Medicinal Uses Lemon Basil shares many of the same medicinal properties that Genovese Basil and other "Sweet Basil" varieties are thought to have. Harvesting Crops Continually pinch fresh leaves off the Basil plant to encourage a bushier production and prevent it from flowering too soon. You can harvest basil plants continually through the summer months if properly maintained. Harvesting Seed Allow the Basil to bolt and begin flowering. At this point, the basil plant will stop producing new leaves and the energy used will be to produce new flowers and seeds. The seeds are found in the spent flower head. It is best to use a fine colander, as the basil seeds are very small. Cut off the spent flower heads and allow them to dry for several days in a warm dry location. Crush the flower heads over the colander and pick out the flower remnants to be left with just seeds.
Anise Seeds
Anise - Pimpinella Anisum $3.29
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Anise Variety: Pimpinella Anisum Family: Apiaceae Botanical Name: Pimpinella Anisum Hardiness Zones: 4,5,6,7,8,9 Growing Difficulty:  3 Soil PH:  5.0 – 7.0 Fertilizer Requirements:  None Soil Type: Poor to Rich, Well Drained Soil, Tolerates Dry Conditions Germination (days): 4 - 14 Soil Temp for Germination: 70 – 75°F Lighting Conditions: Full Sun Days to Maturity:  100 - 120 Planting Depth:  1/8” Distance Apart (in row):  6-18” Row Spacing: 18-24”   Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW WHEN SOIL TEMPS ARE ABOVE 65°F Starting Indoors DO NOT START INDOORS Anise Growing Tips This herb does not transplant well, so expect to leave it in a permanent container or plant directly in the garden. Plant seeds 6 - 18" apart, and thin to 18" once established. Water regularly until the Anise is established. Once established, this plant can tolerate periods of drought and does not like soggy roots. Culinary Uses Traditionally used in licorice flavoring, but also widely used in alcohols, dairy products, liqueurs, meats, candies, etc... The essential oil of Aniseed is used medicinally as well as in body products such as perfume, soaps, lotions and more. Anise Medicinal Uses Anise is commonly used in many food and drug applications. The smell and taste of Aniseed should remind you of a black licorice (as this is typically where licorice gets its flavoring). This herb has been cultivated over the last 4,000 years for use as a diuretic and for treatment of digestive problems as well as a cure for toothaches. In Greek history, aniseed was thought to help breathing, be a pain reliever, increase urine production and ease thirst. Additional medical uses of Aniseed include using it as an expectorant. In high doses, it can be used as an antispasmodic and antiseptic. Used widely for the treatment of cough, asthma, and bronchitis. You will also find that it is commonly used as a treatment for lice, scabies, and psoriasis. Note - Do not use if you are pregnant or expect to become pregnant. Harvesting Anise Seed Harvest Anise seed when the flowers head has turned mostly dry and brown. Cut the heads off with enough stem to hang them upside down in a cool dry area for several weeks. Place a cloth below your hung plants to catch the seeds that will ripen and dry out naturally.
Chamomile - German
Chamomile - German $3.59
Packed in Resealable Long Life MylarMoisture Proof Packets10+ Year Survival Seed Viability Category: Herb Type: Chamomile Variety: German Family: Daisy Botanical Name: Matricaria Chamomilla Hardiness Zones: 3,4,5,6,7,8,9 Growing Difficulty:  2 Soil PH:  5.6 to 7.5 Fertilizer Requirements:  None Soil Type: Rich, Dry, Well-Draining Germination (days): 7 to 14 Soil Temp for Germination: 65-85°F Lighting Conditions:  Partial Shade/Full Sun Days to Maturity:  60 – 90      Planting Depth:  Surface Distance Apart (in row): 4-6" Row Spacing: 6-12"   Sowing Instructions DIRECT SOW IN FULL SUN AFTER LAST FROST Starting Indoors 4-6 WEEKS BEFORE LAST FROST Growing Tips Chamomile grows best in cool and partly shaded areas. Soil should be mostly dry and does not need fertilizer as this can cause weak foliage and fewer flowers. Do not fret about a missed watering, this powerful plant is drought tolerant and does not require much water. Culinary Uses Chamomile leaves tend to be bitter and should be used sparingly but are edible. The blossoms are sweet and are great for desserts like ice cream, custard, and baking. Flowers are also a great garnish or used to add a flavorful statement in salads. Medicinal Uses Chamomile is thought to be able to treat upset stomach and assist as a natural sleep aid. Often found in soaps, lotions and cosmetics, Chamomile is credited with being a great skin care herb. When distilled into an oil, it is often used as an antiseptic, anti-inflammatory and anti-fungal. Harvesting Crops Chamomile flowers will bloom all summer, allowing for a bountiful harvest. The flowers are ready once they fully open (unlike calendula). Simply pluck the flower head from the stem and allow it to dry in an airy environment, away from sunlight. If the flowers are left too long, this annual plant with self-seed and may surprise you with many new starts the next year. Harvesting Seed Once the flowers are done blooming, the seeds should be visible. Harvest the seeds by placing the flower heads in a brown paper bag and shaking. They should easily fall out of the flower heads and once separated from the chaff, all that is left is to store them in a cool dry place until next growing season.